All posts by Alice Hewitt

Alice Hewitt is a 17 year old English blogger and activist. She is autistic and queer and as such takes a large interest in social issues regarding these groups, while also looking at other issues that intersect with these. Alice is particularly interested in looking at (anti)capitalism, media representation, (anti)eugenics and education. This is Alice's first foray into professional writing, in which she hopes to continue for many years in order to both educate other people and be educated herself in the lives and issues of oppressed groups.

Is There an Underlying Problem With How We Frame Autism? Gender, Race, and Misdiagnosis

When I was 16 years old, hands flapping rapidly against the arms of the therapy room chair, a psychologist informed me I had Asperger’s Syndrome. I had never even considered it before, I barely knew a thing about autism spectrum disorders, but once I started learning, everything quickly fell into place. But it left me wondering: why was I diagnosed so late? How did no one notice, in all the years I’d been at school, that I was autistic?

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Lack of representation in fiction: Why is the disabled character always a cisgender, heterosexual, white man?

In fostering understanding and empathy towards marginalised groups, media representation is one of the most important tools at our disposal. Most people consume media in some form, through books, tv shows, film and comics and other types of media. Through this we learn about the world around us and the people in it from a very young age. Portraying marginalised groups accurately and sympathetically can remove some of the prejudice surrounding them, so including these characters is paramount. Disabled people are one of the groups who are still lacking accurate and respectful representation in the media.

There have been some major disabled characters in the past few years; Artie Abrams (Glee), Hermann Gottlieb (Pacific Rim), Walter Jr.(Breaking Bad), Tyrion Lannister (Game of Thrones), Bran Stark (Game of Thrones), Professor Xavier (X-Men), Peeta Mellark (The Hunger Games) and Hiccup (How To Train Your Dragon) are among the most significant and well known. These characters all feature in popular films and TV shows and are very important for disabled representation.

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