All posts by Claire Fitzpatrick

Claire Fitzpatrick is a journalist, author, editor, and poet. Her articles "Why Do People Like Horror Movies?," "Dark Fantasy V Horror: Why Are Their Differences Important? And Which Genre Should You Introduce To Your Children First?" and Body Horror And The Horror Aesthetic'"were all nominated for the 2016 Aurealis Convenors Awards For Excellence. Her short story "Madeline" was included within Dead Of Night: Best Of Midnight Echo, which won the 2016 Australian Shadows Awards for Best Edited Work. She lives in Brisbane, Australia.

Life In Status Epilepticus, Or, What To Do When You Think You’re A Jellyfish

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The Jellyfish

One day she awoke in her room

And discovered she had become

A jellyfish

Her tentacles retracted

Her body shrunk

And she sunk to the ocean floor

She had neither a brain, nor a heart

And she realised she was a butterfly

Who had reverted to its cocoon

A chicken

Who had crawled back inside its egg

She had become a blueprint

Humans would try to use without success

To potentially cycle indefinitely

Between baby and maturity

Maturity and baby

But she realized regeneration

Was a pendulum between

Good death and bad death

Bad death was to lose fertility

Good death was to accept

Damaged crops and replant

But what could she do as a jellyfish?

A jellyfish had no hands to hold

No legs to chase

No lips to kiss a lover

No time to waste

What is the point of living with no love to give?

No thoughts to share?

No lungs to breathe?

One day she awoke in her room

And realised she would never die

Her tentacles retracted

Her body shrunk

She sunk to the ocean floor

And never came up for air.

‘The Jellyfish’ – Claire Fitzpatrick, 2017

1.

In 1894, railroad worker Phineas Gage changed the study of neuroscience forever. His job was to clear rocks for railway tracks, however, one day his iron rod – which he used to tamp down explosives before lighting the fuse – scraped the side of a pile of rocks, igniting a spark which set off the gunpower prematurely. The explosion sent the iron rod straight through his left eye, into his skull, through the back of his head, and back out to the ground almost thirty metres away. Miraculously, Phineas survived, yet became unreliable, partial to swearing and inappropriate remarks. Because of the sustained damage to his frontal lobe, Phineas developed Epilepsy as well as Witzelsucht, a neurological condition characterised by the impulsive and often uncontrollable desire to tell jokes, puns, and pointless stories. In 1860, at the age of 36, he died ‘in status epilepticus,’ described as a single seizure which lasts more than five minutes, or two or more seizures within a five-minute period without the person returning to cognitive normality between them. [1]

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